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Tsunami WebQuest 2004 & 2011
Chimacum Middle School

Created by Al González
Chimacum, WA
Last updated on Saturday, March 12, 2011 (updated resources with Japan tsunami links in 2011)


Intro || Task || Process || Resources || Evaluation || Conclusion
Here are our sample student websites.


Introduction: The strongest earthquake to hit our planet in the last 40 years caused a series of tsunamis that ravaged the coasts of India, Thailand and many Indonesian islands. The destruction and loss of life was so catastrophic that the whole world stood in shock at the sheer power of nature. Many are worried that this could happen again, somewhere else. Maybe at a coast near you.

Seven years after the Asian Tsunami of 2004 another massive earthquake off the coast of Japan ravaged that nation with another deadly tsunami.


Bauunda Aceh, Indonesia before the tsunami hit.
Banda Aceh, Indonesia after the tsunami.


Pictures from NY Times Asia's Deadly Waves Feature.


Japan's 2011 Tsunami photos:

Japan Coast Before and After Tsunami
Japan's coast before and after the tsunami hit, from the Guardian.Co.UK.

Japan Tsunami
Tsunami hits Japanese town, from The Inquisitr.
Tsunami hits Japan's coast.
Wave hits Japan's Coast! From NECCEL.

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Your Task: Your job is to report on what happened as a result of this particular tsunami. The question that you need to answer as a journalist is this, how can an earthquake cause a tsunami?Choose between creating a PowerPoint presentation, a tribute webpage or a written article to share your report.

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Process:

Step 1:

First, begin by dividing the labor. In a team of two, one of you will research the cause of earthquakes while the other will research underwater disturbances and how they cause tsunamis (make sure you explain what a tsunami is). Then both of you will describe how the Asian Tsunami of 2004 ravaged the coasts of many Indonesian islands, Thailand and India. Use the following resources to accomplish your task.

If you have three members in your team, one of you will research the causes of underwater earthquakes, one of you will research tsunamis and one of you will research what the Asian Tsunami of 2004 has done. Use the following resources to accomplish your task.

If you are on a team of four, then one of you will research the causes of earthquakes, one of you will research underwater disturbances and how they cause tsunamis (be sure to explain what a tsunami is), and the other two teammates will report on the Asian Tsunami of 2004 from at least two different sources (feel free to use more). Use the following resources to accomplish your task.

Step 2:
Next, use this sheet for taking notes the causes of earthquakes.

Use this sheet for taking notes on tsunamis.

Use this sheet for taking notes on what the Asian Tsunami of 2004 actually did.

Read about summarizing vs paraphrasing to help you take notes. (Use the Back button on the top left to return to this page.)

Step 3:
Once you are done taking notes, as a team decide on whether you will create a PowerPoint and present it to the class much like a news story, create a tribute webpage for the victims of the 2004 tsunami, or write a report where each member types or writes his or her own page (together you can work on the introduction and conclusion).

 

Step 4:
Storyboard your presentation, webpage or report. Here is a PowerPoint presentation on the purpose of Storyboarding. Here is a storyboard rubric with scoring guide so that you can do the best job possible. Remember, the better your storyboard, the better your final product.

Step 5:
Create your final product!

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Resources:
Start here with the NY Times Feature on the Tsunami!

Earthquake Links
For earthquake information you can also use the Prentice Hall's Science Explorer's Earth Science textbook
(if you have the 2001 edition, go to page 144 in chapter 5, section 1).

New Tsunami Websites! One of my students found the following websites:
The Scientific Background of the Asian Tsunami
Tsunami - Higher level math and physics but some good vocabulary.

Here are some Japan tsunami 2011 links:

Japan tsunami video
Japan hit by tsunami video
Japan earthquake - BBC News
Tsunami in Japan
USGS Japan 8.9 Magnitude Earthquake
USGS Honshu, Japan 8.9 Earthquake
Surviving a Tsunami
Japan Coast Moved 8ft; Earth's Axis Shifted
How Shifting Plates Caused the Earthquake
Map of the Damage
The Crippled Japanese Nuclear Reactors

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Evaluation:

Rubric: Use the following rubrics to score your final product. Here is a research rubric.

CATEGORY

Excellent

4

Good

3

Needs Improvement

2

Poor

1

Notes
Notes are recorded and organized in an extremely neat and orderly fashion.
Notes are recorded legibly and are somewhat organized.
Notes are recorded.
Notes are recorded only with peer/teacher assistance and reminders.
Internet Use
Successfully uses suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance.
Usually able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance.
Occasionally able to use suggested internet links to find information and navigates within these sites easily without assistance.
Needs assistance or supervision to use suggested internet links and/or to navigate within these sites.
Quality of Information
Information clearly relates to the main topic. It includes several supporting details and/or examples.
Information clearly relates to the main topic. It provides 1-2 supporting details and/or examples.
Information clearly relates to the main topic. No details and/or examples are given.
Information has little or nothing to do with the main topic.
Amount of Information
All topics are addressed and all questions answered with at least 2 sentences about each.
All topics are addressed and most questions answered with at least 2 sentences about each.
All topics are addressed, and most questions answered with 1 sentence about each.
One or more topics were not addressed.
Organization
Information is very organized with well-constructed paragraphs and subheadings.
Information is organized with well-constructed paragraphs.
Information is organized, but paragraphs are not well-constructed.
The information is disorganized.

18 to 20 = Excellent researching, 14 to 17 = Good researching, 12 to 13  = Your research needs work, 11 or less = You need to redo your research

PowerPoint/Report Rubric
Website Rubric

 

SELF EVALUATION:
Answer the following questions:
    •How did you use your class time? Briefly describe your daily activities.
    •How did you work with your team?
        •Did you share information and responsibilities?
        •Describe how you broke up the responsibilities.
    •If you were to do this same project again, what would you do differently? What would make this a more meaningful activity for you?

Rate yourself on the following Teamwork Skills rubric.

CATEGORY

Excellent

4

Good

3

Needs Improvement

2

Poor

1

Contributions
Routinely provides useful ideas when participating in the group and in classroom discussion. A definite leader who contributes a lot of effort.
Usually provides useful ideas when participating in the group and in classroom discussion. A strong group member who tries hard!
Sometimes provides useful ideas when participating in the group and in classroom discussion. A satisfactory group member who does what is required.
Rarely provides useful ideas when participating in the group and in classroom discussion. May refuse to participate.
Quality of Work
Provides work of the highest quality.
Provides high quality work.
Provides work that occasionally needs to be checked/redone by other group members to ensure quality.
Provides work that usually needs to be checked/redone by others to ensure quality.
Time-management
Routinely uses time well throughout the project to ensure things get done on time. Group does not have to adjust deadlines or work responsibilities because of this person's procrastination.
Usually uses time well throughout the project, but may have procrastinated on one thing. Group does not have to adjust deadlines or work responsibilities because of this person's procrastination.
Tends to procrastinate, but always gets things done by the deadlines. Group does not have to adjust deadlines or work responsibilities because of this person's procrastination.
Rarely gets things done by the deadlines AND group has to adjust deadlines or work responsibilities because of this person's inadequate time management.
Working with Others
Almost always listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others. Tries to keep people working well together.
Usually listens to, shares, with, and supports the efforts of others. Does not cause "waves" in the group.
Often listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others, but sometimes is not a good team member.
Rarely listens to, shares with, and supports the efforts of others. Often is not a good team player.
Monitors Group Effectiveness
Routinely monitors the effectiveness of the group, and makes suggestions to make it more effective.
Routinely monitors the effectiveness of the group and works to make the group more effective.
Occasionally monitors the effectiveness of the group and works to make the group more effective.
Rarely monitors the effectiveness of the group and does not work to make it more effective.

18 to 20 = Excellent team member, 14 to 17 = Good team member, 12 to 13  = You need to work on being a better team member, 11 or less = You are a poor team member

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Conclusion: Thank you for reporting on this horrible tragedy. Now others can learn what happened in 2004 and at the same time learn a little about earthquake and tsunamis. By learning about the awesome force of nature and seeing what can happen to people we learn respect for nature and for those affected by nature. You learned what causes earthquakes and how special circumstances can lead to tsunamis. But that tsunami wasn't the last act of nature to cause destruction. Follow up on what you learned here by learning about hurricanes, such as Katrina, or about volcanoes, such as Mt. Saint Helens. Nature can be destructive and constructive as well. Try and find out how.

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